Recent News & Events

Northeastern tops off ISEC: New Interdisciplinary Science & Engineering Complex

NU News | How to battle disease using Big Data

May 18, 2015 - Alessandro Vespignani, The Sternberg Family Distinguished University Professor of Physics, Computer Science and Health Sciences, delivered a talk, "Modeling and Forecast of Contagion Phenomena in the Age of Big Data," in the Raytheon Amphitheater. The talk was the inaugural in a series of multidisciplinary summer lectures.

May 18, 2015 – Alessandro Vespignani, The Sternberg Family Distinguished University Professor of Physics, Computer Science and Health Sciences, delivered a talk, “Modeling and Forecast of Contagion Phenomena in the Age of Big Data,” in the Raytheon Amphitheater. The talk was the inaugural in a series of multidisciplinary summer lectures.

When it comes to fighting dis­eases in the 21st cen­tury, Big Data is becoming an inte­gral weapon. At the fore­front of this battle is world-​​renowned net­work sci­en­tist Alessandro Vespig­nani, who is using Big Data to pre­dict a pandemic’s progression.

Vespig­nani, the Stern­berg Family Dis­tin­guished Uni­ver­sity Pro­fessor of Physics, Com­puter Sci­ence, and Health Sci­ences at North­eastern, recently dis­cussed the ways his MoBS Lab is using all types of data—from flight pat­terns to mobile phone information—to deter­mine the spread of a disease.

— Read more of Professor Vespig­nani’s talk over at NU News

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCIS Seattle Event | Women & Minorities in High Tech

WOMEN & MINORITIES IN HIGH TECH
Tuesday, June 16, 2015


Increasing the involvement of women and underrepresented minorities in U.S. high tech companies is a major challenge. The Puget Sound region has the potential to set the standard on how to achieve diversity if our community and companies commit themselves. Come join the discussion as our nationally respected panelists share their experiences and strategic suggestions on specific steps we can take in the Puget Sound region to make significant progress in the percentage of women and underrepresented minorities in our high tech companies.
Panelists:
  • Dr. Carla E. Brodley – Dean, Northeastern University’s College of Computer and Information Science (Moderator)
  • Dr. Telle Whitney – CEO, the Anita Borg Institute and co-founder of the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing
  • Dean C. Garfield – CEO and President, Information Technology Industry Council
  • Gwen Houston – General Manager, Global Diversity and Inclusion, Microsoft
When: Tuesday, June 16, 2015
7:15 a.m. – Registration and breakfast
7:30-8:45 a.m. – Panel and group discussion
Where:
Northeastern University
Seattle Campus
401 Terry Avenue N., Suite 103
Seattle, WA 98109
(cross street is Republican)
The use of public transit is recommended as there is limited parking available.
Price: There is no fee for this event, but registration is required.
» Register Online Today

 

Wall Street Journal | How Companies Are Getting Collaboration Wrong

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Businesses have embraced employee collaboration lately, from software that helps bring together remote teams to open, workspaces designed to better connect employees, with the hope that bringing different types of workers together will lead to breakthrough ideas and solutions.

But is collaboration at work all it’s cracked up to be?

Maybe not. Recent research led by Jesse Shore at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business has found that collaboration sometimes hinders problem-solving because individuals in big groups tend to parrot one another, resulting in a narrow set of solutions.

“We just get caught up in our own gospel around collaboration,” says Ethan Bernstein, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at Harvard Business School, and a coauthor of the paper, with Dr. Shore and David Lazer of Northeastern University.

 

— View the full Wall Street Journal article here.