NSF Workshop on Biologically-Enabled Wireless Networks Design and Modeling

CCIS Professor Guevara Noubir organized a recent NSF workshop in Arlington, Virginia to address the question of biologically-enabled wireless networks. While wireless networks have achieved great successes in the past decade, challenges such as energy efficiency remain. At the same time, bio-organisms such as the brain carry out complex tasks with only a few tens of watts. The clear superiority of biological systems’ efficiency begs the question:  could we one day build biologically -enabled networks?

This conference brought together experts from research, biophysics and biomedical communities to articulate a vision for biologically-enabled wireless networks, define a clear set of challenges to be solved, and make recommendations for future inter-disciplinary collaborations. Presentation topics included:

  • Enabling mechanisms for bio-networks, such as electromagnetic energy harvesting and transduction into biological signals, and magnetic control of biological systems
  • Molecular computation and communication networks considering both the fundamental information and computation theoretic issues and system design
  • Synthetic biology as a way to engineer biologically enabled wireless devices and how biologically enabled devices can be made less sensitive to their environment

Read more at the conference website.